Why Moving to L.A. is One of the Best Moves for a Career in Music

When it comes to starting a successful career in music, where you live is a key factor in getting ahead. And whether you have years of experience or are just starting out, relocating to the city of Los Angeles can be one of the best moves for a budding musical profession. Brought to you by a local mover, Cheap Movers LAX, here are the top 5 reasons to consider moving to the sunny city of Los Angeles.

1. Make Connections

Los Angeles is known for its large music scene and is filled with different kinds of producers, vocalists, DJs, and musicians that are all looking to collaborate and work with each other. Since networking is essential when building a career in music, L.A. can bring valuable connections to your professional act. While living in a small town may be ideal for writing and pondering lyrics, moving to a big city can allow you to find other creatives that can help you in the competitive industry of music.

2. Move Ahead

While it’s good to perfect your craft and build a following within your hometown, you won’t get far in the realm of music if you don’t move ahead and challenge yourself. Moving to L.A. can allow you to compete with other artists in your genre, which can push you to perform better and work harder. You’ll also gain perspective on where you’re at as a musician when you start to see what others are bringing to the table. And other than becoming the best artist you can be, you’ll be able to meet record label executives, studio heads, and other essential individuals who can help advance your career.

3. Get Your Name Out

Besides making connections with those within the music industry, living in L.A. can allow you to get your name out to locals in the area. As music success depends on word-of-mouth, you can perform at one of the hundreds of live venues that the city has to offer. With plenty of talent nights, open-mic performances, and rookie events that draw in crowds, L.A. is a hotspot for finding a new band or voice that’s popular with the masses. And once you’ve gained a few loyal fans in the city, people will start to spread the word about your music.

4. Stay Positive

Building a music career can have its lonely and disheartening moments, especially if you’re going through a musical rut. But living in a lively and supportive city like L.A. can help boost your motivation and keep your mind positive. And with plenty of other struggling musicians and artists who understand where you’re coming from, the city can provide a like-minded community that can get you through a tough week.

5. Learn from Failure

There are some cities, such as New York City, where musicians don’t have the ability to try and fail while earning a living. And while NYC tends to demolish the dreams of young musicians with impossibly high rent prices and a sharp focus on success, L.A. is an ideal place where musicians can experiment with their craft and even fail. Compared to NYC, the city has considerably lower rent prices and an affordable cost of living. So, even if your musical efforts eventually fall short, it can become a valuable learning experience that can help you move forward in your career.

Moving to La La Land

If you do decide to move here, be sure to call on our friends at Cheap Movers LAX to help you get settled in. Moving to such a large and busy city can be overwhelming, but these movers make the moving process affordable and manageable. Get low rates from the most trusted moving professionals in L.A. To get more information or a free quote, check them out here:

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Things to Know Before Moving to NYC for a Music Career

The City That Never Sleeps is reputed as a place of opportunity, where ambitious young people can pursue successful careers in everything from finance to music. With notable music conservatories like Julliard and the Manhattan School of Music, abundant opportunities for collaboration and performance, and the magical world of Broadway, it’s no wonder that so many burgeoning young artists choose to move here in pursuit of a music career. If you’re considering moving to the Big Apple to bolster your music career, there are some things you should know before you move:

New York is Expensive

Most people are aware of NYC’s repute for sky high real estate prices, but many aspiring artists move here without a true grasp of just how expensive living in the big city is. In the first quarter of 2016, the average Manhattan apartment cost $1.95 million, while rental rates were the 2nd highest in the country, just after San Francisco. According to Zumper, the median one-bedroom in Manhattan runs about $3100. Unless you’re independently wealthy, you’ll have to face the realities of getting a day job and living with multiple roommates to pay the bills.

The cost of living in New York is about as high as Manhattan's skyscrapers.

The cost of living in New York is about as high as Manhattan’s skyscrapers.

You’ll Need to Pare Things Down

Along with expensive real estate comes the reality that you’ll have less personal space, so you’ll need to be prepared to do a lot of purging prior to your move. Local NYC movers, Imperial Moving, who have helped thousands of people complete relocations to New York City, note that customers moving from out-of-state are often surprised at just how little space they have in their expensive new apartments. “Many clients come loaded down with entirely too many things and end up having to sell or put the nonessentials in storage.” If you’re serious about moving to New York, be willing to pare down your wardrobe and other belongings to the essentials. Otherwise, you may not even be able to turn around in your small living space much less have room for practicing music.

Get a Day Job

To expand upon the themes of expensive big city and tiny living quarters, keep in mind that moving to NYC means you’ll probably have to get a day job (or two) in order to make ends meet. While playing for tips in the subway might be your dream, unless you also want to sleep in the subway, it’s wise to watch out for other opportunities to make money. Berklee School of Music suggests that music careerists be willing to be versatile and creative in coming up with a workable revenue stream. This doesn’t necessarily mean flipping burgers at McDonald’s; you could put your skills to use with a paying gig as a part-time music teacher or a vocals coach.

Network Until You Can No Longer Speak

As with just about any industry, the music industry is all about who you know. Take every single opportunity you can to connect with anyone you meet, including fellow artists, promoters, and even the guys running sound check. While you can form genuine relationships and even friendships with your new industry acquaintances, this is not the time for modesty and humility. If you don’t sell yourself, no one else will. Talk up your achievements and talents at every outlet possible to get your name out there.

Use every opportunity to connect with as many people as possible in the industry.

Use every opportunity to connect with as many people as possible in the industry.

It Requires a Resilient Spirit

Music is known as a cutthroat industry and it can be difficult to break into already established circles. Adam Small, a music management consultant who spent years as a musician in New York, advises new musicians to prepare for being “vibed” by fellow artists. According to Small, vibing occurs when resident musicians get territorial and snub new arrivals to the scene. Though this attitude may seem like a personal affront, you must be resilient in these situations. Keep your eye on the road to success and like T. Swift wisely advises, “shake it off”.

Success Won’t Happen Overnight

Many people move to New York with the mindset that success will rain down on them as soon as the landing gear makes contact with the tarmac at JFK. This false assumption, popularized and romanticized by Hollywood movies and TV shows, couldn’t be further from the truth. Yes, there is that occasional random story of right-place-at-the-right-time success, but most artists have to claw their way to the top. Once you’re in New York, Sonic Bids suggests that you need to be “mentally and emotionally prepared to dedicate years of hard work to [your] craft”. Successful musicians work hard to get where they are, committing years to perfecting their sound and trying like mad to get their foot in the door whenever possible.

Even though moving to NYC to pursue music comes with its fair share of challenges, it can ultimately be an exciting and successful proposition. Just make sure you’re fully prepared for what’s ahead!

7 Reasons New Students Should Get Involved in Band or Choir

Moving to a new city as a teenager is one of the hardest things to do. New friends and situations can be stressful to cope with as the teenager acclimates to the unfamiliar culture and surroundings. Great Guys, a leader in the relocation and auto shipping industry, indicates that millions of Americans will move this summer. In recent years, American moves, particularly cross country ones, have been on the rise, as people seek warmer climates and better economic opportunities. Among the population moving are many families with children and teenagers, who might be resistant to the thought of moving. If your students are among the thousands of American teens that will be forced to uproot and relocate this summer, take a look at the music programs available for your teenager at their new school this fall. One of the best ways to ease the anxiety of this transition is by encouraging new students to join band or choir. Music is a universal language that can be shared between every gender and race, making it a great way for new students to feel like they fit in, in their new school. Here are 7 reasons encouraging your student to join the band or choir is a great idea:

1. Instant Best Friends

It can be difficult for teens to break into new social circles because solid friendships are often already in place as junior high or high school arrive. When a teen enters band, however, they have an instant subject to use as an ice breaker with others. Plus, most middle and high school bands have the opportunity of attending and performing football games, concerts, and competitions. These extracurricular activities make for an easy segue into other social events.

Your teen might even make lifelong friends through band or choir.

Joining band or choir can help your teen adjust to a new social climate; they might even make lifelong friends.

2. Encourages Teamwork

According to the National Association of Music Parents, band and choir teaches teamwork skills. In performances, individuals must come together to cohesively perform the given piece of music, melding their individual talents into a group product. This encourages both self-improvement and teamwork. Working with others is a critical skill that translates into life beyond high school, useful in future careers, relationships, and more.

3. Forms Nerve-Cell Connections

It’s a well-known fact that band members are often straight-A students. In fact, playing music helps kids and teens make new and complex neurological connections. Music For All points out that teens will often do better in all of their academic classes, particularly in math and science, when music is a daily part of life.

Learning music helps stimulate complex neurological connections, which makes teens better math and science students.

Learning music helps stimulate complex neurological connections, which makes teens better math and science students.

4. Introduces Students to Community

Teens will make friends with their bandmates, and they’ll also have a chance to meet others in the community too. Joining a music program almost always requires some fundraising responsibilities. Teens might work with neighbors or local businesses in order to raise money for that next field trip or competition outing.

5. Helps Entire Family Bond with Neighborhood

Teens aren’t the only ones who’re dealing with a transition. Parents also have some struggles as they transport their lives and settle into the new home. Music programs encourage parents to get involved by volunteering to chaperone events and helping out with fundraising. This is a great way to meet fellow choir or band parents and make new friends.

6. Develops Leadership Abilities

Each band member has a chance at being a leader. These leadership roles might rotate through the group as the year wears on, such as conducting the group or leading an instrument section. Who knows, you might even be raising the next drum major! Being able to lead is a skill that enhances the teen’s self-esteem and serves them well as adults.

Programs that require extracurricular activity help students hone their time management skills, so they have the upper hand when starting college.

Programs that require extracurricular activity help students hone their time management skills, so they have the upper hand when starting college.

7. Time Management and Discipline

Being in a band or choir means that there’s extra work besides the academic classes. Teens must organize and manage their time very wisely or else the music or school will suffer. Personal discipline, such as studying hard and going to bed early, is inherent with band members.

Ideally, try to time your move during the summer months. Your teenager won’t miss out on any school, and they have a chance to meet other band members as practice often runs through the warmer months anyway. As fall arrives, the teen will already have a strong group of friends through the band so they’ll be able to better concentrate on academics.