7 Reasons New Students Should Get Involved in Band or Choir

Moving to a new city as a teenager is one of the hardest things to do. New friends and situations can be stressful to cope with as the teenager acclimates to the unfamiliar culture and surroundings. Great Guys, a leader in the relocation and auto shipping industry, indicates that millions of Americans will move this summer. In recent years, American moves, particularly cross country ones, have been on the rise, as people seek warmer climates and better economic opportunities. Among the population moving are many families with children and teenagers, who might be resistant to the thought of moving. If your students are among the thousands of American teens that will be forced to uproot and relocate this summer, take a look at the music programs available for your teenager at their new school this fall. One of the best ways to ease the anxiety of this transition is by encouraging new students to join band or choir. Music is a universal language that can be shared between every gender and race, making it a great way for new students to feel like they fit in, in their new school. Here are 7 reasons encouraging your student to join the band or choir is a great idea:

1. Instant Best Friends

It can be difficult for teens to break into new social circles because solid friendships are often already in place as junior high or high school arrive. When a teen enters band, however, they have an instant subject to use as an ice breaker with others. Plus, most middle and high school bands have the opportunity of attending and performing football games, concerts, and competitions. These extracurricular activities make for an easy segue into other social events.

Your teen might even make lifelong friends through band or choir.

Joining band or choir can help your teen adjust to a new social climate; they might even make lifelong friends.

2. Encourages Teamwork

According to the National Association of Music Parents, band and choir teaches teamwork skills. In performances, individuals must come together to cohesively perform the given piece of music, melding their individual talents into a group product. This encourages both self-improvement and teamwork. Working with others is a critical skill that translates into life beyond high school, useful in future careers, relationships, and more.

3. Forms Nerve-Cell Connections

It’s a well-known fact that band members are often straight-A students. In fact, playing music helps kids and teens make new and complex neurological connections. Music For All points out that teens will often do better in all of their academic classes, particularly in math and science, when music is a daily part of life.

Learning music helps stimulate complex neurological connections, which makes teens better math and science students.

Learning music helps stimulate complex neurological connections, which makes teens better math and science students.

4. Introduces Students to Community

Teens will make friends with their bandmates, and they’ll also have a chance to meet others in the community too. Joining a music program almost always requires some fundraising responsibilities. Teens might work with neighbors or local businesses in order to raise money for that next field trip or competition outing.

5. Helps Entire Family Bond with Neighborhood

Teens aren’t the only ones who’re dealing with a transition. Parents also have some struggles as they transport their lives and settle into the new home. Music programs encourage parents to get involved by volunteering to chaperone events and helping out with fundraising. This is a great way to meet fellow choir or band parents and make new friends.

6. Develops Leadership Abilities

Each band member has a chance at being a leader. These leadership roles might rotate through the group as the year wears on, such as conducting the group or leading an instrument section. Who knows, you might even be raising the next drum major! Being able to lead is a skill that enhances the teen’s self-esteem and serves them well as adults.

Programs that require extracurricular activity help students hone their time management skills, so they have the upper hand when starting college.

Programs that require extracurricular activity help students hone their time management skills, so they have the upper hand when starting college.

7. Time Management and Discipline

Being in a band or choir means that there’s extra work besides the academic classes. Teens must organize and manage their time very wisely or else the music or school will suffer. Personal discipline, such as studying hard and going to bed early, is inherent with band members.

Ideally, try to time your move during the summer months. Your teenager won’t miss out on any school, and they have a chance to meet other band members as practice often runs through the warmer months anyway. As fall arrives, the teen will already have a strong group of friends through the band so they’ll be able to better concentrate on academics.

 

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